Cycling – form, frequency and regime

Tips on form to reduce injuries
  • Get into the habit of standing and riding with a straight back. This will ease the lower back pain and also improve your riding.
  • Observe how you are gripping the handlebars. The grip should be firm yet relaxed.
  • Change hand positions frequently.
  • Remember to keep the wrist straight.
  • Keep the elbows slightly flexed to stop the ‘road shock’ transferring to the arms and upper body. This will reduce the risk of shoulder injury.
  • If RSI symptoms persist, keep cycling limited to one hour stretches.



How much is enough - frequency
"it generally takes racers five years of training and competition to find out if they have enough talent to succeed"

"I think all these systems do say the same thing. Get in a base, then add in stress (intervals), and be sure you keep the weekly mileage appropriate for the distance you will ride competitively."

"the secret to preventing injuries and preparing yourself to get the most out of the training tips that follow, is to develop a good, personal mileage base"

"maximum aerobic conditioning (increasing VO2max) occurs with 3 workout days per week. So unless one is trying to burn Calories to lose weight, or is working on increasing mileage to get the musculoskeletal system (back, shoulders) in shape for a long endurance event on the bike, it is better to take off 2 to 3 days per week to allow for muscle and ligament repair and decrease the risk of cumulative stress resulting in an increase in training injuries. And interestingly, it appears that these 3 days per week will maximize aerobic conditioning equally in any combination - i.e. 3 days in a row with 4 off, alternating days of exercise, etc."

“Aim for a total time commitment per week of 10 hours. It's interesting that two of America's all-time great road riders, Greg LeMond and Connie Carpenter, both recommend the same total weekly training time -- 10 hours -- for fast recreational riders. They say if you devote that much to a mix to distance, speed, climbing and easy rides for recovery, you're likely to come close to your potential. And time on the bike seems to be the key, not the miles ridden." (http://www.cptips.com/trnoptn.htm)


Regime:

"A good weekly training program:
  • is built on a good training base at the beginning of the season.
  • 3 days of high level cardiovascular activity (2 of which may be intervals) -
  • 1 day training ride equal to the duration of the event and at a similar intensity
  • 1 day LONG slow recovery ride
  • the other 2 days should be spent off the bike or used for a short slow ride to "loosen up"

 Example:

Day
Intensity
Duration (minutes)
Distance (kms)
Monday:
Easy
45
20
Tuesday:
Interval
120
50
Wednesday:
High level
120
50
Thursday:
Interval
120
50
Friday:
Easy
45
20
Saturday:
Intense
120
50
Sunday:
Recovery
120
30
Total

690
270

Hours
11.5


"In order to get stronger, faster and more powerful, they [Experts] explain, sometimes rather than bearing down, an athlete needs to lighten up ... The harder you push, the more carefully you must observe the low points of your periodization schedule." (http://www.letdf.com/the-tour/tour-de-france-training-regimen/)

(Interesting notes about Lance Armstrong: especially how he puts in 3-6 hours per day. )
Post a Comment